Finding your great book idea by Emma Smith-BartoN

A great book starts with a great idea. A spark, if you will. That idea needs to be enough to sustain a whole novel, to tell a full and compelling and complete story. It also needs to be interesting enough to keep you committed throughout the process. And, if you’re aiming for publication, it also needs to be strong enough to find an agent, publisher, and readers. A great idea really is the start of it all. But how can you find yours?

FIVE TIPS TO READ YOURSELF INTO A BETTER WRITER BY CAROLYN WARD

For this blog we’re going to be looking at how to read as a writer. What else can we squeeze out of our reading that can help us become better writers?

1. Tame your TBR and RE-READ!

THREE SIMPLE STEPS TO WRITING YOUR PERFECT HOOK BY JULIE MARNEY LEIGH

Hooks. We’ve all heard about the importance of a good hook. But what exactly is it? And how do we write one?

Let’s begin by looking at the elevator pitch – the entire story condensed into one sentence. A daunting prospect! But it doesn’t have to be. Because the perfect elevator pitch is made up of three parts – your story concept, your main character, your main conflict. And it highlights one question for each of these elements.

  1. Concept – is it high enough?
  2. Character – what do they want?
  3. Conflict – why can’t they have it?

Emma Smith-Barton

Mentor

Emma is the author of YA novel The Million Pieces of Neena Gill (July 2019, Penguin Random House). She is represented by Jo Unwin.

 

Carolyn Ward

Mentor

Carolyn Ward writes MG and is represented by Northbank Talent. 

JULIE MARNEY LEIGH

Mentor

Julie Marney Leigh writes contemporary novels for teens about fun, friendship and feminism. She grew up in Lancashire, and now lives in Scotland where she gained a Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Edinburgh, and fell in love with the city.